Gov. Kristi Noem calls for nominations for schools to win $100K in fitness equipment

Beatrice J. Doty

Gov. Kristi Noem launched a new fitness campaign called “Don’t Quit!” for South Dakota schools Wednesday that will award three schools some new fitness equipment.

Noem joins the National Foundation for Governors’ Fitness Councils with this campaign. The organization will deliver a state of the art fitness center to three elementary or middle schools selected from nominations.

Nominations for a chance to win $100,000 in fitness equipment at a local school will be accepted through March 16.

“Programs like DON’T QUIT! help children to make better choices that will strengthen their bodies and their minds,” Noem said in a statement. “I encourage every elementary and middle school in our great state to nominate their school today for this incredible opportunity.”

Each fitness center is financed through public-private partnerships with companies like The Coca-Cola Company, Anthem Foundation, Wheels Up and Nike, and doesn’t rely on taxpayer dollars or state funding, according to a news release from Gov. Noem’s office. MyFitnessStore.com provides the fitness equipment.

Physical activity and exercise are shown to help prevent and treat more than 40 chronic diseases, enhance individual health and quality of life, and reduce health care costs, according to Noem’s release.

In schools, studies show that physical activity improves academic achievement, increases confidence and self-esteem, reduces discipline problems, cuts absenteeism, and fosters better interpersonal relationships.

To nominate your school, visit www.natgovfit.org.

This article originally appeared on Sioux Falls Argus Leader: Gov. Kristi Noem wants 3 SD schools to win $100K in fitness equipment

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