Why Public Health Needs a New Gun Doctrine | The Health Care Blog

It is long past time for us to think differently about guns. The problems is not the tool as much as it is the user. If we can’t admit that hard truth to ourselves, there is no way to address the issue.

Why Public Health Needs a New Gun Doctrine | The Health Care Blog.

How Medicare ‘Self-Referral’ Thrives on Loophole – WSJ – WSJ

More great examples of the sleaze factor in our healthcare industry. You just cannot make this stuff up. Wearing a white coat and a stethoscope has become a license to lie, cheat, obfuscate, and steal. And no one seems to want to do anything about it. I have a solution: get Your Personal Affordable Care Act and avoid the healthcare industry. You think Obama’s going to save you from any of this? Not a chance. Too many campaign contributions at stake.

How Medicare ‘Self-Referral’ Thrives on Loophole – WSJ – WSJ.

Doctor gives chemo to patients who DO NOT have cancer

4 Habits Of Lucky People | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

Love this. Luck is basically what you create for yourself through optimism, instinct, expectations, and opportunities to succeed.

4 Habits Of Lucky People | Fast Company | Business + Innovation.

The Case for Drinking as Much Coffee as You Like – The Atlantic

Love this article on the health benefits of drinking coffee, especially when it isn’t complicated by sweeteners and/or heavy cream. I have believed — and said — for years, that black coffee is good for you. It’s mostly water (which is one reason that it does NOT dehydrate you) with dissolved plant solids, many of which we probably know little about. I was right. Again.

The Case for Drinking as Much Coffee as You Like – The Atlantic.

Regular Exercise Is Part of Your Job

Harvard Business Review:

An excellent article at the Harvard Business Review Blog on the importance of exercise to doing work. This is a crucial and almost completely ignored business imperative.

Originally posted on HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review:

When we think about the value of exercise, we tend to focus on the physical benefits. Lower blood pressure, a healthier heart, a more attractive physique. But over the past decade, social scientists have quietly amassed compelling evidence suggesting that there is another, more immediate benefit of regular exercise: its impact on the way we think.

Studies indicate that our mental firepower is directly linked to our physical regimen. And nowhere are the implications more relevant than to our performance at work. Consider the following cognitive benefits, all of which you can expect as a result of incorporating regular exercise into your routine:

  • Improved concentration
  • Sharper memory
  • Faster learning
  • Prolonged mental stamina
  • Enhanced creativity
  • Lower stress

Exercise has also been show to elevate mood, which has serious implications for workplace performance.  I’m willing to bet that your job requires you to build interpersonal connections and foster collaborations. Within this…

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American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer

Very important policy position from the American Society of Clinical Oncology on the role of obesity in elevating cancer risk. The best way to keep yourself out of an oncologist’s office is to build and sustain fitness and pursue weight loss to the extent that you can.

American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer.

Who Doesn’t Need a Better Press? | StrongFirst

For those of you who actually understand the importance of physical strength, a great and amusing read by India’s first SFG, Dr. B. Ramana, on how to build your kettlebell press.

Remember, there are no such things as useful weakness or useless strength.

Who Doesn’t Need a Better Press? | StrongFirst.

Things that make me go ARGH: Overuse of antibiotics for pharyngitis | The Incidental Economist

We overtreat even the simplest, self-limited problems. Worse still is the example that this sets for our kids. That you should go running willy nilly to the doctor for every conceivable ache, pain, sniffle, or cough, with no ability to discern the serious from the minor and too few skills to apply even modest self-care for a few days to see if the problem resolves on its own. We are a nation of cry babies.

Things that make me go ARGH: Overuse of antibiotics for pharyngitis | The Incidental Economist.

What was Ezekiel Emanuel thinking?

Vik Khanna:

Who is Ezekiel Emanuel, and why does he want you to die before your time?

Originally posted on Your Personal Affordable Care Act:

In 1984, Colorado governor Richard Lamm gave a now-infamous interview in which the very ill elderly  should die and get out of the way, thus helping the generations following them to thrive in political and economic environments that have fewer claims on scarce resources (a canard on its face, given that economies are ever-expanding). Thirty years later, along comes Ezekiel Emanuel, brother of Chicago Mayor Rahm, buddy of Barack, and a principal architect of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. In a lengthy post at The Atlantic, Emanuel, a physician and ethicist, posits that he’s happy to live to age 75 and then die, because, to paraphrase, better to go quickly than to linger and by then I will have exhausted my talents and you will, too, so why don’t you join me.

Setting aside scare tactics about Obamacare death panels (anyone with knowledge of public…

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Paul A. Offit: The Anti-Vaccination Epidemic – WSJ

Great essay on the problems created by the anti-vaccination crowd.

Paul A. Offit: The Anti-Vaccination Epidemic – WSJ.

Mom struck by cyclist in Central Park dies | New York Post

Vik Khanna:

The irresponsibility of an incompetent cyclist in NYC led to the 100% preventable death of a woman out for walk while shopping for her daughter’s wedding present. It was wrong and deserves punishment.

Originally posted on Your Personal Affordable Care Act:

This tragic event is a great example of what it means to be personally (ir)responsible in the pursuit of health. A fit cyclist, racing through the streets of Manhattan, possibly as fast as 25 mph, strikes and kills a middle-aged mom out for a walk in Central Park before shopping for her daughter’s wedding present. This cyclist, Jason Marshall, hit Jill Tarlov so hard, after screaming for her to get out of his way while he was careening down the street illegally in a cars-only lane, that he is a criminal, in my view.

As cyclists started tweeting about Ms. Tarlov’s death, one person speculated that New York City should make brakeless bikes (speculated in this case, but not confirmed; I’m a cyclist and I’ve never heard of such a thing) illegal. No. The New York City Council and Board of Health do not need to engage in any more…

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